Recent Alumni

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Elizabeth Beam
Research Assistant

Elizabeth Beam graduated from Duke University in 2013 with a BS in Neuroscience, a BA in English, and a minor in Chemistry. Her undergraduate research mapped the network structure of neuroanatomical and psychological terms in the literature of cognitive neuroscience. As a Research Assistant in the Buckner lab, she examined large-scale network connectivity in young adults vulnerable to mental illness.

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Rosa Capellan

Rosa Capellan
Research Administrator

Rosa was a Research Administrator for the Psychiatric Neuroimaging Division at the Massachusetts General Hospital and Harvard University. Rosa provided administrative and research related support to the Psychiatric Neuroimaging Division. She completed and submitted appropriate documents to the Institutional Review Board as required for the division’s research studies. Rosa also scheduled special events and meetings, and provided assistance to guest speakers.


Laura Farfel

Laura Farfel
Research Assistant

Laura was a Research Coordinator in the Buckner Lab and managed research exploring deep phenotyping in individual participants involving in-depth study of real-world behaviors and change of brain states over time in healthy individuals. She also coordinated a 12-month longitudinal imaging study on circuit dynamics underlying longitudinal fluctuations in mood and cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar patients.


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Aya Hamadeh
Research Assistant

Aya was a Research Assistant. She received her BA in psychology from the American University of Beirut, Lebanon before completing her MSc in Clinical Neuroscience at the University College London, UK. Aya worked on the neuroimaging component of a project aimed at exploring the links between behavior, genetics and brain structure, and as part of the Human Connectome Project.

 


Meghan Hind

Meghan Hind
Undergraduate Student

Meghan will enter her final semester as an undergraduate at Harvard College in the fall as a degree candidate for a BA in Neurobiology within the Mind Brain Behavior program. Her research explores fluctuations in behavior, cognition, and mood as well as their impacts on and interactions with brain state and network correlates over time in real-world, naturalistic settings. In order to do so, her most recent work involves combinatory approaches to methodology encompassing participant self-report, behavioral and physiological continuous data collection, and BOLD fMRI. After graduation, she plans to pursue further research opportunities in the field.


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Marisa Hollinshead
Research Coordinator

Marisa was a research manager in the Buckner lab and coordinates the Brain Genomics Superstruct Project (GSP), a large-scale study focused on understanding typical brain variation and differences associated with illness risk. She also led a project focused on autism and developed a novel paradigm which probes social brain function in patient populations. Marisa was interested in utilizing neuroimaging approaches to study neurodegenerative and neuropsychiatric illness with the aim to make advancements in identifying brain biomarkers of disease.

[pubmed]


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R. Matthew Hutchison, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Matt was a Sir Frederick Banting Postdoctoral Fellow. He received his undergraduate and doctoral training at the University of Western Ontario in Canada. Matt’s previous work focused on evolutionarily preserved and divergent large-scale brain circuits. He explored the dynamic and coordinated integration of information flow in normal and disease states.

[pubmed] [cv] [web]


Marisa Marotta

Marisa Marotta
Research Assistant

Marisa Marotta is a Research Assistant in the Buckner Lab. She graduated from Boston College in 2015 with a BS in Psychology and a minor in Mandarin Chinese. Her undergraduate research focused on the neurobiology of feeding behavior with rats. Currently as a research assistant, Marisa is working on the deep phenotyping projects involving the in-depth study of real-world behaviors and change of brain states over time in healthy individuals and college students. Additionally, she is advancing a 12-month longitudinal imaging study on circuit dynamics underlying longitudinal fluctuations in mood and cognition in schizophrenia and bipolar patients from McLean Hospital. She plans to pursue a graduate degree in the field.


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Abid Qureshi, MD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Abid was in a post-residency fellowship in Cognitive Neurology at BWH. He received his medical degree from the University of Missouri – Kansas City and completed his Neurology residency at Johns Hopkins University. Abid’s research interests were in the dysfunction of large-scale networks in disease states. He looked at structural morphometry in 16p11.2 CNV carriers (autism), and at resting-state fMRI in this cohort.

[pubmed]


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Anna Rieckmann, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Anna’s main research interest was in understanding the role of dopamine in human cognition and disease. She used both PET and fMRI to explore whether changes in the integrity of the dopamine system across the adult lifespan contribute to age-related declines in cognitive functions. Her research project investigated whether dopamine-related changes in cognition and functional connectivity in older adults are dissociable from other age-related cascades, such as those associated with amyloid accumulation and white matter changes. She also developed an interest in pharmacological MRI as a tool for studying the effects of pharmacological manipulations of the dopamine system on brain and behavior.

[pubmed] [cv]


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Jorge Sepulcre, MD PhD
Asst Professor of Radiology

Jorge Sepulcre was a faculty member at the Division of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School. His research focused on brain imaging studies aiming at the understanding of large-scale brain networks implicated in human cognition and neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s disease. He used functional connectivity MRI and network theory techniques to untangle network properties of the human brain.

[email] [pubmed]


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Emily Shaw
Research Assistant

Emily Shaw was a Research Assistant in both the Buckner Lab and Sperling Lab. She graduated from Rhodes College in 2013 with a B.S. in Neuroscience and a minor in Religious Studies. As a neuroimaging R.A. , she performed scans for the Human Connectome Project and the Harvard Aging Brain study. She also worked on a project correlating executive function task-based MRI and biomarkers of aging.

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Koene Van Dijk, PhD
Instructor of Radiology

Koene Van Dijk was an instructor in Radiology at the Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. He was interested in normal and pathological human brain aging, Alzheimer’s disease, mild cognitive impairment, dementia, large scale neuronal networks, white matter hyperintensities, and in-vivo amyloid imaging using Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), resting-state fMRI, task-based fMRI, functional connectivity MRI, diffusion imaging, positron emission tomography (PET), longitudinal study design (i.e. multiple measures over time), linear mixed models for handling more than two measures over time and missing data.

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