People


Principal Investigator


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Randy Buckner, PhD
Professor of Psychology and Neuroscience

Randy is the Sosland Family Professor of Psychology and of Neuroscience at Harvard University affiliated with the Center for Brain Science and Director of the Psychiatric Neuroimaging Research Division at the Massachusetts General Hospital. He is also on the faculty of the Athinoula A. Martinos Center for Biomedical Imaging. Trained in cognitive psychology and systems neuroscience, Randy’s work has centered on understanding how the brain supports high-level cognition and why dysfunction arises in illness.

 

[email] [pubmed] [cv] [web]


Post-doctoral Fellows


 
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Kevin Anderson, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Kevin is a Postdoctoral Fellow in the Buckner Lab. He is interested in how individual differences in brain organization and function emerge from genetic variation, with a focus on understanding changes across the lifespan. Kevin completed his doctoral studies at Yale University with Avram Holmes, where he used cross-disciplinary neuroscientific techniques to study the molecular correlates of cortico-striatal brain networks and neuroimaging phenotypes related to major depression and schizophrenia.

[Google Scholar] [cv] [GitHub] [Website]

 


Jingnan Du

Jingnan Du, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Jingnan is a Postdoctoral fellow in the Buckner lab. He received his PhD in applied mathematics from Fudan University. Jingnan is interested in how have brain circuits changed between humans and non-human primates over the course of evolution. He is also interested in the identification and prioritization of MRI biomarkers associated with early-stage Alzheimer’s disease using genetic risk.

[email] [Google Scholar]

 

 


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Maxwell Elliott, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Max is a postdoctoral fellow in the Buckner lab. He is interested in understanding how the brain generates individuality and how individual differences in brain organization influence the risk for brain disorders. In particular, he is interested in developing tools to precisely measure accelerated brain aging and to detect the earliest stages of neurodegenerative disorders. He completed his PhD at Duke University where he worked with Profs. Terrie Moffitt, Avshalom Caspi and Ahmad Hariri.

[email] [Google Scholar]


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Aya Hamadeh, MD, MSc
Post-doctoral Fellow

Aya is a postdoctoral fellow at the Buckner lab. She received her medical degree at the American University of Beirut after completing her MSc in Clinical Neuroscience at University College London and then working as a research assistant at the Buckner lab. Aiming towards a career in neuroradiology, she is interested in utilizing novel imaging techniques for improved detection and monitoring of neuropsychiatric diseases. 

[email]


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Lindsay Hanford, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Lindsay is interested in discovering objective biological markers for mental health outcomes, and developing algorithms for individual assessment of disease risk, burden, and outcome. In the Buckner lab, her work aims to elucidate structural markers of treatment response at the individual level. Lindsay received her PhD in Neuroscience from McMaster University, and completed a three-year postdoctoral associate position at the University of Pittsburgh before joining the lab

[email][Google Scholar]

 


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Habiballah Rahimi Eichi, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Habib is a Postdoctoral Research fellow in the Buckner lab. He received his PhD in electrical engineering from NC State University. With his background in control systems and big data analysis, he is interested in investigating the correlation of the lifestyle and environmental stimuli with the brain activity and connections. He is currently working on computational approaches to explore deep individual phenotyping.

[email][Google Scholar] [cv]


Noam Saadon-Grosman, PhD Post-doctoral Fellow

Noam Saadon-Grosman, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Noam is interested in brain functional topographies, mainly of the somatomotor representations. She aims towards their characterization within individual brains. Also, understanding the somatomotor topography as part of the large-scale functional organization, including higher-order cognitive and affective functions. Noam has completed her BSc in physics followed by MSc and PhD in neurobiology at the Hebrew university in Jerusalem, focusing on cortical somatosensory processing.

[email][Google Scholar]

 


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Roey Schurr, PhD
Post-doctoral Fellow

Roey is a postdoctoral collaborator from the Gershman Lab. He is intrigued by the search for mechanistic explanations to various cognitive processes. To understand how the brain gives rise to behavior, he believes we must integrate behavioral studies, computational models of cognition and advanced neuroimaging.  He completed his PhD in Computational Brain Science at the Hebrew University of Jerusalem (ELSC). Working with Prof. Aviv Mezer, he developed methods for in vivo mapping of white-matter tracts using multi-modal quantitative MRI. 

[email][Google Scholar]


Graduate Students


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Peter Angeli
Graduate Student

Peter is a Ph.D. student in the Neuroscience program of the Division of Medical Sciences. He received his B.S. in Neuroscience from Johns Hopkins University, where he worked on novel animal models of Alzheimer’s Disease. He is interested in exploring the neural basis of episodic memory, and how different aspects of memory might alter that neural representation.

[email] [Google Scholar]

 


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Lauren DiNicola
Graduate Student

Lauren is a Ph.D. student in the Cognition, Brain and Behavior program of the Psychology Department. She received undergraduate training in Psychology at Harvard and subsequently completed a fellowship in Developmental and Computational Social Neuroscience at the Yale Child Study Center. She is interested in understanding human social processes, including neurobiological underpinnings and influences on behavior.

[email] [Google Scholar] [Linked In]

 


Wendy Sun
Graduate Student

Wendy is an MD/PhD student in Biological & Biomedical Sciences at Harvard Medical School, supported by the PD Soros Fellowship. She received her B.S. in Neuroscience from Yale in 2018, where she worked with Dr. Hedy Kober to study food choice and regulation of craving for food in humans. She is interested in applying a systems neuroscience approach to study cognitive control, decision-making, and reward, with the ultimate goal of informing understanding and treatment of neuropsychiatric disease. 

[email] [Google Scholar] [Linked In]


Constanza (Cony) M. Vidal Bustamante
Graduate Student

Cony is a Ph.D. student in the Cognition, Brain and Behavior program of the Psychology Department. She grew up in Chile, and moved to the United States to complete her undergraduate studies at Harvard College, where she received a B.A. in Psychology. She subsequently worked in Leah Somerville’s lab as research manager for the Human Connectome Project in Development, a large-scale multimodal brain study aiming to chart age-related changes in neural network properties in children, adolescents, and adults. Cony is interested in the extensive longitudinal assessment of brain circuitry in the individual, as well as in its relationship to fluctuations in real-world behaviors (e.g. sleep, social activity), affective experiences (e.g. mood, stress), and mental and physical health outcomes. 

[email]


Undergraduate Students

Oluwatobi Ariyo
Undergraduate Student

Tobi is an undergraduate student pursuing a joint concentration in Neuroscience and Philosophy, working towards his thesis in the Buckner Lab. He is interested in exploring moral cognition and the neurobiological underpinnings that inform moral decision making. In the Buckner Lab, Tobi is examining how distinct neural networks might inform different moral frameworks. 

[email]

 


Staff


Francesca Davy-Falconi Research Assistant

Francesca is a Research Assistant in the Buckner Lab. In 2021, she received her BA in Philosophy & Neuroscience from Boston University. During her undergraduate career, she researched the biological mechanisms underlying Alzheimer’s disease, as well as the interaction of political tribalism and social media. Most recently, she designed and conducted a study on memory, storytelling, and COVID-19 (viralrecall.org). She is particularly interested in the intersection of the humanities and cognitive neuroscience, and plans to attend graduate school in the future.

[email]


Stephanie

Stephanie Kaiser
Research Assistant

Stephanie is a Research Assistant in the Buckner Laboratory. She graduated from the University of Virginia in 2021 with a B.A. in Interdisciplinary Studies combining psychology, biology, and philosophy. As an undergraduate, she was involved in neuroimaging research that examined how social support influences reactions to threat exposure in the Virginia Affective Neuroscience Laboratory. Additionally, she conducted her own independent research study to explore the process of how emotion contagion changes during relationship development. She is particularly interested in the biological mechanisms that regulate emotion and hopes to complete a PhD in Clinical Psychology in the future.  

[email]


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Kayla Ntoh
Research Assistant

Kayla is a Research Assistant in the Buckner Laboratory. She graduated in 2020 from Amherst College with a B.A. in Psychology. She has worked in a Neuroscience lab where she studied GABA mutations in zebrafish, and she has done Orthopedic research as well. She was on the Pre-Medical track during her undergraduate career and hopes to matriculate to medical school in the future.

[email]


Affiliated Investigators


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Justin Baker, MD PhD
Instructor of Psychiatry

Justin Baker is a faculty member in the Department of Psychiatry at McLean Hospital, Harvard Medical School and Associate Director of the Research Concentration Program for the MGH / McLean Adult Psychiatry Residency Program. His research focuses on brain imaging studies in psychotic disorders. Justin received his undergraduate degree in Neuroscience from Brown University, before obtaining his MD and PhD degrees at Washington University in St. Louis. Since completing his Residency in Psychiatry with the MGH/McLean program, he has received multiple fellowships to pursue research on the biology of psychotic disorders using high-throughput functional and structural imaging and genetics, under the guidance of Dr. Dost Öngür (McLean Hospital) and Dr. Randy Buckner (Harvard / MGH).

[email] [pubmed]


Mark Eldaief

Mark Eldaief
Asst Professor of Neurology

Mark Eldaief, MD, MMSc is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at Harvard Medical School at the Massachusetts General Hospital. His research involves the use of non-invasive stimulation to modulate intrinsic functional networks. He uses functional neuroimaging (including fMRI and PET) and deep phenotyping to track stimulation-induced changes in brain states and behavior, respectively. He is particularly interested in intrinsic networks involved in emotional processing (e.g. those distributed across prefrontal cortical and subcortical nodes).

[email] [pubmed]

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